Studies of Northeast Barrens

Understanding the unique biology associated with this geography

A number of studies have explored bees, butterflies and moths, and other species associated with these fire-adapted barrens habitats. Here we highlight some key papers, and provide a reference list for further reading.

Highlights

A zotero library of relevant references is being developed over the course of this project. Please feel free to contribute to this group resource! The following are included as of February 2021.

  • Akresh, M. E., and D. I. King. 2016. Eastern whip-poor-will breeding ecology in relation to habitat management in a pitch pine–scrub oak barren. Wildlife Society Bulletin 40:97–105.

  • Albanese, G., P. D. Vickery, and P. R. Sievert. 2007. Habitat characteristics of adult frosted elfins (Callophrys irus) in sandplain communities of southeastern Massachusetts, USA. Biological Conservation 136:53–64.

  • Albanese, G., P. D. Vickery, and P. R. Sievert. 2008. Microhabitat use by larvae and females of a rare barrens butterfly, frosted elfin (Callophrys irus). Journal of Insect Conservation 12:603–615.

  • Anderson, M. G. n.d. Northeast Habitat Guides: A Companion to the Terrestrial and Aquatic Habitat Maps. 394.

  • Antoine, C. M., and J. R. K. Forrest. 2021. Nesting habitat of ground-nesting bees: a review. Ecological Entomology 46:143–159.

  • Avian ecology in Wisconsin pine barrens - ProQuest. n.d. <https://www.proquest.com/openview/3a1b6536158a12e13ac18770f39e6ea1/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=18750&diss=y>. Accessed 11 Jan 2022.

  • Bailey, R. G. 2016. Bailey’s ecoregions and subregions of the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Forest Service Research Data Archive, Fort Collins, CO. <https://www.fs.usda.gov/rds/archive/Catalog/RDS-2016-0003>. Accessed 2 Mar 2022.

  • Bartomeus, I., J. S. Ascher, J. Gibbs, B. N. Danforth, D. L. Wagner, S. M. Hedtke, and R. Winfree. 2013. Historical changes in northeastern US bee pollinators related to shared ecological traits. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 110:4656–4660.

  • Bayfield County Forestry and Parks Committee. 2021. Chapter 4000 Barrens Management Plan. Page 31 in. County Forest Land Use Plan 2021-2035. Bayfield County Forest, Bayfield County, Wisconsin. <https://www.bayfieldcounty.org/DocumentCenter/View/11708/Chapter-4000-Barrens-Final-20210325?bidId=>. Accessed 20 Jan 2022.

  • Bried, J. T., and A. M. Dillon. 2012. Bee diversity in scrub oak patches 2 years after mow and herbicide treatment. Insect Conservation and Diversity 5:237–243.

  • Bried, J. T., N. A. Gifford, and K. M. Robertson. 2015. Predicted Crown Fire Risk Adds Incentive to Restore Open-Canopy Pine Barrens at the Wildland-Urban Interface. Journal of Sustainable Forestry 34:147–167.

  • Bried, J. T., J. E. Murtaugh, and A. M. Dillon. 2012. Local Distribution Factors and Sampling Effort Guidelines for the Rare Frosted Elfin Butterfly. Northeastern Naturalist 19:673–684.

  • Bried, J. T., W. A. Patterson, and N. A. Gifford. n.d. Why Pine Barrens Restoration Should Favor Barrens Over Pine. Restoration Ecology 22:442–446.

  • Burrell, L. M. 2019. Identifying pollinator communities visiting berry-producing plants on coastal barrens. Honours, Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, NS, Canada. <http://library2.smu.ca/xmlui/handle/01/28529>. Accessed 19 Jun 2021.

  • Buxton, S. H., J. Hopwood, R. Moranz, and R. Powers. n.d. Rangeland Management and Pollinators: A Guide for Producers in the Great Plains. 6.

  • Cameron, S. A., J. D. Lozier, J. P. Strange, J. B. Koch, N. Cordes, L. F. Solter, and T. L. Griswold. 2011. Patterns of widespread decline in North American bumble bees. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 108:662–667.

  • Cane, J. H. 1987. Estimation of Bee Size Using Intertegular Span (Apoidea). Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 60:145–147.

  • Cane, J. H. 1991. Soils of Ground-Nesting Bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea): Texture, Moisture, Cell Depth and Climate. Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 64:406–413.

  • Carboni, M., and G. LeBuhn. n.d. Effect of Distance among Bowls on Numbers of Bees Captured. 3.

  • Chole, H., S. H. Woodard, and G. Bloch. 2019. Body size variation in bees: regulation, mechanisms, and relationship to social organization. Current Opinion in Insect Science 35:77–87.

  • Comer, P., D. Faber-Langendoen, R. Evans, S. Gawler, C. Josse, G. Kittel, S. Menard, M. Pyne, M. Reid, K. Schulz, K. Snow, and J. Teague. 2003. Ecological Systems of the United States: A Working Classification of U.S. Terrestrial Systems. Text, NatureServe, Arlington, VA. <https://www.natureserve.org/biodiversity-science/publications/ecological-systems-united-states>. Accessed 11 Jun 2021.

  • Corbin, J. D., and E. L. Flatland. unpublished. Mapping potential targets for restoration of globally rare pine barrens and sandplain ecosystems.

  • Corbin, J. D., and R. K. Thiet. 2020. Temperate biocrusts: mesic counterparts to their better‐known dryland cousins. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 18:456–464.

  • Danforth, B. N., R. L. Minckley, J. L. Neff, and F. Fawcett. 2019. The Solitary Bees: Biology, Evolution, Conservation. Princeton University Press. <https://press.princeton.edu/books/hardcover/9780691168982/the-solitary-bees>. Accessed 19 Jun 2021.

  • Dighton, J., A. S. Morale Bonilla, R. A. Jimînez-Nûñez, and N. Martînez. 2000. Determinants of leaf litter patchiness in mixed species New Jersey pine barrens forest and its possible influence on soil and soil biota. Biology and Fertility of Soils 31:288–293.

  • Dighton, J., A. R. Tuininga, D. M. Gray, R. E. Huskins, and T. Belton. 2004. Impacts of atmospheric deposition on New Jersey pine barrens forest soils and communities of ectomycorrhizae. Forest Ecology and Management 201:131–144.

  • Droege, S., C. A. Davis, W. E. Steiner, and J. Mawdsley. 2009. The Lost Micro-Deserts of the Patuxent River: Using Landscape History, Insect And Plant Specimens, And Field Work to Detect And Define A Unique Community. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 111:132–144.

  • Droege, S., V. J. Tepedino, G. Lebuhn, W. Link, R. L. Minckley, Q. Chen, and C. Conrad. 2010. Spatial patterns of bee captures in North American bowl trapping surveys. Insect Conservation and Diversity 3:15–23.

  • Drummond, F. A., A. C. Dibble, C. Stubbs, S. L. Bushmann, J. S. Ascher, and J. Ryan. 2017. A Natural History of Change in Native Bees Associated with Lowbush Blueberry in Maine. Northeastern Naturalist 24:49–68.

  • Edwards, C. B., and E. E. Crone. n.d. Estimating abundance and phenology from transect count data with GLMs. Oikos n/a. <https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/oik.08368>. Accessed 9 Jul 2021.

  • Embry, P. 2020. Building a Better Bee Trap: Researchers Say Bee Bowls Are Overused. Entomology Today. <https://entomologytoday.org/2020/06/12/building-better-bee-trap-bowls-overused/>. Accessed 23 Apr 2021.

  • Ferster, B., B. R. Leppo, M. T. Swartz, K. Vulinec, F. Habegger, and A. Mehring. 2008. Lepidoptera of Fort Indiantown Gap National Guard Training Center, Annville, Pennsylvania. Northeastern Naturalist 15:141–148.

  • Forman, R., editor. 1979. Pine Barrens: Ecosystem and Landscape. Academic Press, New York.

  • Fowler, J. 2016. Specialist Bees of the Northeast: Host Plants and Habitat Conservation. Northeastern Naturalist 23:305–320.

  • Fowler, J. 2020. Pollen Specialist Bees of the Central United States. <https://jarrodfowler.com/bees_pollen.html>. Accessed 24 Feb 2021.

  • Gallerani, K. n.d. Kingston pine barren, coastal plain pond area protected. 3.

  • Garlapow, R. M. n.d. Whip-poor-will Prey Availability and Foraging Habitat: Implications for Management in Pitch Pine / Scrub Oak Barrens Habitats. 58.

  • Geib, J. C., J. P. Strange, and C. Galen. 2015. Bumble bee nest abundance, foraging distance, and host-plant reproduction: implications for management and conservation. Ecological Applications 25:768–778.

  • Gezon, Z. J., E. S. Wyman, J. S. Ascher, D. W. Inouye, and R. E. Irwin. 2015. The effect of repeated, lethal sampling on wild bee abundance and diversity. Methods in Ecology and Evolution 6:1044–1054.

  • Gobster, P. H., A. Arnberger, I. E. Schneider, K. M. Floress, A. L. Haines, M. J. Dockry, and C. Benton. 2021a. Restoring a “scenically challenged” landscape: Landowner preferences for pine barrens treatment practices. Landscape and Urban Planning 211:104104.

  • Gobster, P. H., I. E. Schneider, K. M. Floress, A. L. Haines, A. Arnberger, M. J. Dockry, and C. Benton. 2021b. Understanding the key characteristics and challenges of pine barrens restoration: insights from a Delphi survey of forest land managers and researchers. Restoration Ecology 29:e13273.

  • Goldstein, P. Z., and J. S. Ascher. 2016. Taxonomic and Behavioral Composition of an Island Fauna: A Survey of Bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Anthophila) on Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 118:37–92.

  • Goldstein, P. Z., and M. W. Nelson. 2017. Two psammophilic noctuids newly associated with beach plum, Prunus maritima (Rosaceae): The Dune Noctuid (Sympistis riparia) and Coastal Heathland Cutworm (Abagrotis benjamini) in Northeastern North America (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae). ZooKeys 61–89.

  • Greenleaf, S. S., N. M. Williams, R. Winfree, and C. Kremen. 2007. Bee foraging ranges and their relationship to body size. Oecologia 153:589–596.

  • Grundel, R., R. P. Jean, K. J. Frohnapple, G. A. Glowacki, P. E. Scott, and N. B. Pavlovic. 2010. Floral and nesting resources, habitat structure, and fire influence bee distribution across an open-forest gradient. Ecological Applications 20:1678–1692.

  • Harmon-Threatt, A. 2020. Influence of Nesting Characteristics on Health of Wild Bee Communities. Annual Review of Entomology 65:39–56.

  • Heinrich, H. H. 1987. Review of WATER, EARTH, AND FIRE: LAND USE AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING IN THE NEW JERSEY PINE BARRENS. Landscape Journal 6:90–92.

  • Hessl, A. E., T. Saladyga, T. Schuler, P. Clark, and J. Wixom. 2011. Fire history from three species on a central Appalachian ridgetop. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 41:2031–2039.

  • Hessl, A., T. Saladyga, T. Schuler, P. Clark, and J. Wixom. 2011. Fire history from three species on a central Appalachian ridgetop. Canadian Journal of Forest Research. <https://cdnsciencepub.com/doi/abs/10.1139/x11-125>. Accessed 12 Jun 2021.

  • Howard, L. F., T. D. Lee, and R. T. Eckert. 2011. Forest community composition and dynamics of the Ossipee Pine Barrens, New Hampshire. The Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society 138:434–452.

  • Jones, B. 2010. Barrens Habitat. Pennsylvania Game Commission.

  • Kalhorn, K. D., E. M. Barrows, and W. E. LaBerge. 2003. Bee (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Apiformes) Diversity in an Appalachian Shale Barrens. Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 76:455–468.

  • Koh, I., E. V. Lonsdorf, N. M. Williams, C. Brittain, R. Isaacs, J. Gibbs, and T. H. Ricketts. 2016. Modeling the status, trends, and impacts of wild bee abundance in the United States. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113:140–145.

  • Kranz, C., and T. Whitman. 2019. Short communication: Surface charring from prescribed burning has minimal effects on soil bacterial community composition two weeks post-fire in jack pine barrens. Applied Soil Ecology 144:134–138.

  • Kuffner, A. 2018. What in blazes? They’re burning R.I. forests, turning back the clock | video. Providence JournalMay 2018; section News:17.

  • Kurczewski, F. E. 1999. Historic and Prehistoric Changes in the Rome, New York Pine Barrens. Northeastern Naturalist 6:327–340.

  • Kurczewski, F. E., and H. F. Boyle. 2000. Historical Changes in the Pine Barrens of Central Suffolk County, New York. Northeastern Naturalist 7:95–112.

  • Lafon, C. W., A. T. Naito, H. D. Grissino-Mayer, S. P. Horn, and T. A. Waldrop. 2017. Fire history of the Appalachian region: a review and synthesis. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-219. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 219:1–97.

  • Latham, O. 2020. Bee diversity of three Appalachian shale barren sites. Masters, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA. <https://scholarscompass.vcu.edu/etd/6426/>. Accessed 19 Jun 2021.

  • Laughlin, D., and C. Uhl. 2003. The xeric limestone prairies of Pennsylvania. Castanea 68:300–316.

  • LeBuhn, G., E. F. Connor, M. Brand, J. F. Colville, K. Devkota, R. B. Thapa, M. Kasina, R. K. Joshi, K. Aidoo, P. Kwapong, C. Annoh, and P. B. and M. K. Rafique. 2016. Monitoring pollinators around the world. Pollination Services to Agriculture. Routledge.

  • Leuenberger, W., S. Bearer, J. Duchamp, S. Johnson, B. Leppo, P. McElhenny, and J. Larkin. 2016. A Comparison of Lepidoptera Communities Inhabiting Restored and Late Successional Pitch Pine—Scrub Oak Barrens in Pennsylvania. Natural Areas Journal 36:38–47.

  • Lougee, J. 2015. Fire Management Plan for Ossipee Pine Barrens Preserve. Conservation Plan, The Nature Conservancy, Concord, NH.

  • Luque, S. S., R. G. Lathrop, and J. A. Bognar. 1994. Temporal and spatial changes in an area of the New Jersey Pine Barrens landscape. Landscape Ecology 9:287–300.

  • MASON, S. C. 2015. Butterflies & Skippers (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea, Hesperioidea) of the Franklin Parker Preserve, Burlington County, New Jersey. Transactions of the American Entomological Society (1890-) 141:351–368.

  • Mid-Atlantic Native Meadows: Guidelines for Planning, Preparation, Design, Installation, and Maintenance. n.d. 40.

  • Musacchio, N. 2018. WINTER SURVIVAL AND HABITAT SELECTION OF TRANSLOCATED NORTHERN BOBWHITE IN THE NEW JERSEY PINE BARRENS. Thesis, University of Delaware. <https://udspace.udel.edu/handle/19716/24004>. Accessed 11 Jan 2022.

  • Oehler, J. D., D. F. Covell, and S. Capel. n.d. Managing Grasslands Shrublands and Young Forest Habitats for Wildlife A Guide for the Northeast. 154.

  • Olson, M. G. 2011. Tree Regeneration in Oak-Pine Stands with and without Prescribed Fire in the New Jersey Pine Barrens: Management Implications. Northern Journal of Applied Forestry 28:47–49.

  • Orr, R. L. 2010. Preliminary list of the bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) of Assateague Island National Seashore, Worcester County, Maryland. The Maryland Entomologist 5:41–50.

  • Pfitsch, W. A., and E. H. Williams. n.d. Habitat Restoration for Lupine and Specialist Butterflies. Restoration Ecology 17:226–233.

  • Pinelands Forestry Advisory Committee. 2006. Recommended Forestry Management Practices. <https://www.nj.gov/pinelands/appli/tools/new%20forms/Recommended%20Forestry%20Management%20Practices%20Report.pdf>. Accessed 20 Jan 2022.

  • Pollinator Best Management Practices for Roadsides and Other Rights-of-way. n.d. 4.

  • Portman, Z. M., B. Bruninga-Socolar, and D. P. Cariveau. 2020. The State of Bee Monitoring in the United States: A Call to Refocus Away From Bowl Traps and Towards More Effective Methods. Annals of the Entomological Society of America 113:337–342.

  • Poulos, H. 2015. Fire in the Northeast: Learning from the Past, Planning for the Future. Journal of Sustainable Forestry 34:6–29.

  • Poulos, H. M., R. S. Freeman, J. M. Karberg, K. C. Beattie, D. I. O’Dell, and K. A. Omand. 2020. Effects of Mowing and Prescribed Fire on Plant Community Structure and Function in Rare Coastal Sandplains, Nantucket Island, MA, USA. Environmental Management 65:111–121.

  • Prendergast, K. 2020. What’s the Best Method to Monitor Wild Bees? Entomology Today. <https://entomologytoday.org/2020/08/05/best-method-monitor-wild-bees/>. Accessed 23 Apr 2021.

  • Prendergast, K. S., M. H. M. Menz, K. W. Dixon, and P. W. Bateman. 2020. The relative performance of sampling methods for native bees: an empirical test and review of the literature. Ecosphere 11:e03076.

  • Quigley, K. 2020. Restoring Pine Barrens Habitat: Optimizing Soil Conditions with Prescribed Fire. Rooted in Research, Northern Research Station, Forest Service, USDA.

  • Quigley, K. M., R. Kolka, B. R. Sturtevant, M. B. Dickinson, C. C. Kern, D. M. Donner, and J. R. Miesel. 2020. Prescribed burn frequency, vegetation cover, and management legacies influence soil fertility: Implications for restoration of imperiled pine barrens habitat. Forest Ecology and Management 470–471:118163.

  • Quigley, K. M., R. Kolka, B. R. Sturtevant, M. B. Dickinson, C. C. Kern, and J. R. Miesel. 2021. Restoring open canopy pine barrens from the ground up: Repeated burns correspond with increased soil hydraulic conductivity. Science of The Total Environment 767:144258.

  • Quigley, K. M., R. E. Wildt, B. R. Sturtevant, R. K. Kolka, M. B. Dickinson, C. C. Kern, D. M. Donner, and J. R. Miesel. 2019. Fuels, vegetation, and prescribed fire dynamics influence ash production and characteristics in a diverse landscape under active pine barrens restoration. Fire Ecology 15:5.

  • Radeloff, V. C., D. J. Mladenoff, and M. S. Boyce. 2000. A Historical Perspective and Future Outlook on Landscape Scale Restoration in the Northwest Wisconsin Pine Barrens. Restoration Ecology 8:119–126.

  • Radeloff, V. C., D. J. Mladenoff, H. S. He, and M. S. Boyce. 1999. Forest landscape change in the northwestern Wisconsin Pine Barrens from pre-European settlement to the present. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 29:11.

  • Raleigh, L., J. Capece, and A. Berry. 2003. Sand Barrens Habitat Management: A Toolbox for Managers. The Trustees of Reservations, Vineyard Haven, MA.

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